17.359 bibliography on reproduction

From: Humanist Discussion Group (by way of Willard McCarty willard.mccarty@kcl.ac.uk)
Date: Thu Oct 30 2003 - 01:43:26 EST

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                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 17, No. 359.
           Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.kcl.ac.uk/humanities/cch/humanist/
                            www.princeton.edu/humanist/
                         Submit to: humanist@princeton.edu

             Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2003 06:27:59 +0000
             From: <dgants@rogers.com>
             Subject: bibliography (promised in Humanist 17.344)

    > From: "Jim Marchand" <marchand@UX1.CSO.UIUC.EDU>
    > Date: 2003/10/28 Tue AM 10:32:21 EST
    > To: <humanist@Princeton.EDU>
    > >
    > This is the handout for my talk at Kalamazoo last spring, on
    > "Reproduction & Registration of Scholarly Materials." It is just
    > sort of offhand. I talked also on `aerial' photography of sites,
    > using a small dirigible.
    >
    > 1. On visual perception in general: Richard L. Gregory, Eye and
    > Brain. The Psychology of Seeing. 2d ed. World University Library
    > (NY: McGraw-Hill, 1973); Carolyn M. Bloomer, Principles of Visual
    > Perception. 2d ed. (NY: Design Press, 1990).
    >
    > 2. George G. Cameron, "Darius Carved History on Ageless Rock,"
    > National Geographic Magazine (December, 1950), 825-844. On his work
    > on the Old Persian Bisitun inscription and taking squeezes of it.
    >
    > 3. The first use of photography on film for scholarly purposes: F.
    > A. Leo, "Eine Lesart im Codex Argenteus," Zeitschrift fuer
    > vergleichende Sprachforschung 6 (1857), 193-201.
    >
    > 4. Photography.
    >
    > 5. Electronic article, James W. Marchand, "The Computer as Camera
    > and Darkroom," in Offline37, published by Robert Kraft.The article
    > has been posted for ftp in the following groups: HUMANIST,
    > IOUDAIOS, and RELIGION, January 30, 1992. It appears in hard copy
    > in Religious Studies News 7, 2 (March 1992) and CSSR Bulletin 21,
    > 2 (April 1992). Idem, "The Use of the Personal Computer in the
    > Humanities," Ideal 2 (1987) 17-32; reprinted in Christian T.
    > Petersen, ed., Gotica minora (Hanau: Syllabus, 2002), 14-30.
    >
    > 6. The field of digital photography moves apace. A good statement
    > of what is available au moment can be found in Digital Photography,
    > "Digicam Catalog," 24-87.
    >
    > 7. On the fate of our Gothic manuscripts during WW II, see James W.
    > Marchand, "Notes on Gothic Manuscipts," JEGP 56 (1957), 213-24).
    >
    > 8. As a sample of how some people handle these matters:
    > Arnemagnaean Institute & Dictionary, Bulletins, 1963-64 on. Tells
    > of the work of photographer Arne Mann Nielsen and conservator
    > Birgitte Dall. Binding and restoration, but not how. Nielsen uses
    > UV and other methods. From 1971 on manuscripts have been being
    > transferred to Iceland, e.g. the Flateyarbok and the Codex Regius.
    > Bulletin 10 (1973-75) tells about Birgitte Dall's learning of
    > conservation, etc. and the establishment of a school of restoration
    > in 1973 under the auspices of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Some
    > quotes from Bulletin 10: "she has abandoned silk tulle in
    > preference for japanpaper (hooray!)," "Birgitte Dall firmly
    > dissociates herself from chemicals" (double hooray!). "Permanent
    > incapsulation in plastic is completely dismissed by Birgitte Dall."
    > Number 11 tells of the use of computer driven color photographs and
    > the Ciba-Ilford method, in order to make colored photographs of
    > manuscripts. Two articles on the restoration in the Arnemagnaean:
    > Erik Dal, in Bogvennen 1979. 17-34 and in the Dansk
    > Kunsthaandvaerker Leksikon I, 1979, 113-114. Birgitte Dall retired
    > in 1982, but continued as consultant.
    >
    > 9. On Karl Hauck's suggestions as to squeezings and rubbings: Karl
    > Hauck, "Colloquium des Max-Planck-Instituts fuer Geschichte in
    > Goettingen ueber die von Karl Hauck, Erlangen, im Rahmen seiner
    > Forschungen zur unschriftlichen Laienkultur des fruehen
    > Mittelalters durchgefuehrten Untersuchungen archaeologischer Fein-
    > und Restbefunde," Deutsches Archiv 14 (1958), 313-314. Idem, "Neues
    > Verfahren fuer Archaeologen. Die Abformung archaeologischer Funde
    > mit Hilfe versilberter Kollodiumhaeutchen," Archiv fuer
    > Kriminologie 120 (1957), 127-128.
    >
    > 10. Jim Gerakaris (good man!) reports on a method, called "scanning
    > macrography," which allows one to overcome focusing problem
    > inherent in all macrophotography in an article, "New Photographic
    > Possibilities through the Use of Scanning Photomacrography," Kodak
    > Techbits (Summer, 1988), 7-11. It is a model of clarity, showing
    > examples of before and after and showing how one can arrange a
    > set-up which will allow one to do scanning photomacrography in
    > focus.
    >
    > 11. Holography. Howard M. Smith, Principles of Holography (NY:
    > Wiley, 1969). A good practical introduction. A good place to visit:
    > http://www.holoworld.com/. They have the "Internet Webseum of
    > Holography", with everything you need, even including online
    > lessons. For those with more of a bent towards the technical:
    > Leonid Yaroslavsky and Murray Eden, Fundamentals of Digital Optics.
    > Digital Signal Processing in Optics and Holography (Boston:
    > Birkhaeuser, 1996). See particularly the restoration of picture
    > sharpness on p. 228, by a method useful in restoring poor pictures
    > of lost manuscripts, e.g. the Gothic Giessen fragment. Hans I.
    > Bjelkhagen & H. John Caulfield, eds., Fundamental Techniques in
    > Holography. SPIE Milestone Series, MS 171 (Bellingham, WA: SPIE,
    > 2001). A great collection of papers. A good way to get an
    > overview. Holography 2000, ed. Tung H. Jeong and Werner K. Sobotka.
    > Published by SPIE -- The International Society for Optical
    > Engineering, 2000. Collection of papers. Good for keeping up-to-
    > date.
    >
    > 12. 3D printing, sintering laser and the like: Sunny Bains, "Sony,
    > Zebra Developing Practical Printers based on MIT Technology:
    > Holography Eyes Mass-Market Imprint," Electronic Engineering Times
    > No. 996 (March 9, 1998), 39 f. A report on MIT's attempt to develop
    > a holographic printer. Gene Bylinsky, "Industry's Amazing Instant
    > Protototypes," Fortune 137 (Jan. 12, 1998), 120 ff. On the use of
    > such things as sintering laser to make three dimensional copies.
    > Caren B. Potter, "Concept Modelers: the Latest Trend in Rapid
    > Prototyping, Computer Graphics World 20.12 (December, 1997), 45 ff.
    > A report on 3D printing, a variation of RP.
    >
    > 13. To see an example of a tripod photo-tower: Med arkeologen
    > Sverige runt. Naer-Var-Hur-Serien (Stockholm: Forum, 1965), 64.
    >
    > 14. On the discovery of how ancient purple looked: Gerhard
    > Steigerwald, "Die antike Purpurfaerberei nach dem Bericht Plinius'
    > des Aelteren in seiner `Naturalis Historia'," Traditio 42 (1986),
    > 1-57. K. Schneider, "Purpura," Paulys Realencyclopaedie der
    > classischen Altertumswissenschaft 23 (1959), 2000-2020.
    >
    > 15. Virtual Reality and 3D: Mark Pesce, VRML Browsing & Building
    > Cyberspace (Indianapolis: New Riders, 1995), with a foreword by Tim
    > Berners-Lee, creator of www. It even contains a very nice CD-ROM.
    > To kind of keep up with the kinds of generators and browsers
    > available, read David Aubrey, "A virtual evolution," Computer
    > Shopper 16.12 (Dec., 1996), 612 ff. (lots of www addresses). A
    > great new development, particularly for you and me, drawing klutzes
    > that we are, is announced in PC Mag 15.22 (Dec 17, 1996), 10: "You
    > take at least two photos of any object from different angles,
    > digitize the photos {you and I know we could just take the
    > pictures, no need to scan}, draw lines between congruent spots on
    > the different views, and then watch as the software creates a 3-D
    > wireframe of the object. The software overlays photographic
    > detail back onto the wireframe, and voilů! You've created a 3-D
    > image without using a CAD program or a 3-D rendering tool.
    > The technology is already used in the medical and product-design
    > fields. The small file sizes make the software ideal for creating
    > images for Web-based product catalogs." At my own university:
    > http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/Viz/VR/vr-homepage.html.
    >
    > 16. On the drawing and photographing of runes: Erik Moltke, Jon
    > Skonvig og de andre runetegnere (Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 1958).
    > Especially Chapter XIX, "Runefotografiet og lidt om de nyere
    > metoder."
    >
    > 17. Photography in Archaeological Research, ed. Elmer Harp, Jr. A
    > School of American Research Book (Albuquerque: University of New
    > Mexico Press, 1975). A collection of essays; covers the field well.
    >
    > Harold C. Simmons, Archaeological Photography (NY: NYU Press,
    > 1969).
    >
    > Vera M. Conlon, Camera Techniques in Archaeology (London: John
    > Baker, 1973).
    >
    > Drawing Archaeological Finds, by Conant Brodribb (NY: Association
    > Press, 1971). Many good tips.
    >
    > Ulrich Leute, Archaeometry (Weinheim: VEH, 1987). An excellent
    > survey.
    >
    > Katherine May, Imaging the Ancients. University of Pennsylvania
    > Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (UPenn Press, 1998).
    >
    > 18. Online resources for learning about imaging:
    >
    > "Introduction to Imaging" at
    > http://www.getty.edu/gri/standard/introimages/index.html;
    >
    > "Creating and Documenting Electronic Texts: A Guide to Good
    > Practice" at http://ota.ahds.ac.uk/documents/creating/
    >
    > "Image Scanning: A Basic Helpsheet" at
    > http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/helpsheets/scanimage.html
    >
    > 19. Scientific Photography:
    >
    > 1. R. B. Haselden, Scientific Aids for the Study of Manuscripts
    > (Oxford, 1935). Read this first.
    >
    > 2. There is a very nice beginning bibliography in: Chauncey
    > Sanders, An Introduction to Research in English Literary History
    > (NY: Macmillan, 1952), 404-406.
    >
    > 3. For more intensive work, the various issues of Photographic
    > Literature, ed. Albert Boni, e.g. Photographic Literature 1960-1970
    > (Hastings-on-Hudson: Morgan & Morgan, 1972). Good annotations.
    >
    > 4. For keeping up past this, Art Index.
    >
    > 6. Alfred A. Blaker, Handbook for Scientific Photography, 2d ed
    > (Boston: Focal Press, 1989). I have found this one very good for
    > instruction.
    >
    > 7. Probably your best single sources are the Kodak Data Books: M-2,
    > "Using Photography to Preserve Evidence"; N-12A, "Close-Up
    > Photography"; M-28, "Applied Infrared Photography"; N-12B
    > "Photomacrography"; M-27, "Ultraviolet and Fluorescence
    > Photography"; M-28, "Infrared and Ultraviolet Photography"; N-9,
    > "Basic Scientific Photography"; B-3, "Kodak Filters for Scientific
    > and Technical Uses". They are cheap, reliable, and usually have
    > good bibliographies, though out of date.
    >
    > 8. For keeping right up to date, ask the Eastman Kodak Company to
    > send you their free publication Techbits, a periodical with
    > information on all the lastest developments, such as scanning
    > macrophotography.
    >
    > 20. Digital Photography:
    >
    > 1. Computer select. A CD-ROM issued monthly by Information Access.
    > Full text source from over 150 journals.
    >
    > 2. Manijeh Majlessi, Digital Photography (Washington, D. C.:
    > Library of Congress, 1995). A rather desultory bibliography.
    >
    > 3. Charles W. Bailey, Jr., ed., Scholarly Electronic Publishing
    > Bibliography. URL: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html. Now in
    > its 30th issue, April 2, 2000, 1,130 entries.
    >
    > 4. Peter Robinson, The Digitization of Primary Textual Sources
    > (Oxford: Office for Humanities Communication, 1993). Easy to read,
    > not very technical, good overview.
    >
    > 21. Image Processing:
    >
    > 1. The best book on digital image processing is still: Rafael C.
    > Gonzalez & Richard E. Woods, Digital image processing (Reading,
    > Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1993). Good examples, good survey, math not
    > overwhelming.
    >
    > 2. If you do not want to do your own programming, a very good book
    > is: Michael Seul, Lawrence O'Gorman, Michael J. Sammon. Practical
    > algorithms for image analysis : description, examples, and code
    > (Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000). Its
    > CD-ROM contains C programs that implement the algorithms discussed
    > in the book, plus the LIBTIFF, LIBMIG, and LIBIP libraries and
    > sample images in TIFF format.
    >
    > 3. A good small book is Photographic Imaging & Electronic
    > Photography, series editor Sidney F. Ray (Oxford: Focal Press,
    > 1994). It consists of excerpts from the large Focal Encyclopedia
    > of Photography, 3d ed., ed. Leslie Stroebel and Richard Zakia
    > (Oxford: Focal Press, 1993). Out of date, but good.
    >
    > 4. A quick orientation may be obtained from Steven Greenberg The
    > Complete Idiot's Guide to Digital Photography (Indianapolis: Que,
    > 1999). It also contains a CD-ROM which is of some use.
    >
    > 22. Color:
    >
    > 1. The absolute best reference for our purposes is Sigmund Skard,
    > "The Use of Color in Literature. A Survey of Research," Proceedings
    > of the American Philosophical Society (1946), 163-249. It is well
    > organized. Here you can find that Wackernagel = Wilhelm
    > Wackernagel, "Die Farben- und Blumensprache des Mittelalters," in
    > his _Kleinere Schriften_, vol. 1 (Leipzig, 1872), 143-240, and that
    > Portal is Fr. Portal, _Des couleurs symboliques dans l'antiquite,
    > le moyen-age et les temps modernes_, nouvelle ed. (Paris, 1938),
    > and about such works as W. E. Mead, "Color in Old English Poetry,"
    > PMLA 14 (1899), 169-206, color in Chaucer (nos. 657-659) or in
    > Latin or Greek, etc. etc.
    >
    > 2. For the anthropological approach: Brent Berlin and Paul Kay,
    > _Basic Color Terms, their Universality and Evolution_, paperback
    > edition (University of California Press, 1991; SBN 520-01442-1).
    > It is good to use the paperback edition, since it contains added
    > bibliography up to 1990. There is very little overlap with Skard.
    >
    > 3. A good book on the color spectrum and its reproduction is R. W.
    > G. Hunt, _The Reproduction of Colour_, 3d ed. (NY: John Wiley &
    > Sons, 1975; there may be newer editions). For computer
    > reproduction and the like: Michael and Pat Rogondino, _Computer
    > Color. 10,000 Computer-Generated Process Colors_ (San Francisco:
    > Chronicle Books, 1990; ISBN 0-87701-739-5).
    >
    > 4. The various concept dictionaries and the cross-cultural survey
    > naturally take up color. For computer color, cf. Sally Wiener
    > Grotta and Daniel Grotta, _Digital Imaging for Visual Artists_ (NY:
    > McGraw-Hill, 1994), 536: "Obviously, the question of color is a
    > driving force within the imaging industry. It's the number one
    > stumbling block ..."
    >
    > R. W. G. Hunt, The Reproduction of Colour in Photography, Printing
    > and Television. 3d ed. (NY: Halsted Press, 1975; ISBN
    > 0-470-15085-8). An old standby; I am sure there are later eds.
    >
    > Agnes Geijer, Albertus Pictor, maalare och paerlstickare.
    > Riksantikvarieaembetets och statens historiska museums
    > utstaellningar, Nr. 7; Stockholm, 1949. Includes a careful study
    > of the composition of his paints, done by spectroscopic analysis on
    > Haerkeberga's paintings.
    >
    > Madeleine Hours, Conservation and Scientific Analysis of Painting,
    > tr. Anne G. Ward (NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1976; ISBN
    > 0-442-23549-6).
    >
    > The Codex Argenteus reconstitution: The image can be accessed via
    > ftp at ftp.lang.uiuc.edu/ftp/pub/images. The image is available in
    > .GIF and .PCX formats.



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